February is Adopt a Rescue Rabbit Month

Adopting A Rabbit

Celebrating Adopt A Rescued Rabbit Month.

Awwww, so cute. (Photo: petfinder.com)

Awwww, so cute. (Photo: petfinder.com)

 

Are you thinking about adopting a rabbit? Well you couldn’t have chosen a more perfect time, being its Adopt a Rescued Rabbit month.

As with anything in life, such as a pet, comes responsibility; and before you make a final decision on moving forward with giving Peter Cotton Tail a new home, we thought we’d fill you in on the basics of rabbit care. Just a little tid bit. People who are allergic to cats or dogs, and  want a pet-this is your kind of animal , as many people who have allergies to felines and canines, do not have them with bunnies. With their adorable, button-like nose, all the way to their fluffy fur and tails, what’s not to love?

Rabbit Food Pyramid (Photo: Justrabbits.com)

Rabbit Food Pyramid (Photo: Justrabbits.com)

First things first, what do they veg on? The ASPCA and MyHouseRabbit.com  recommends that they’ll be quite satisfied with pellets, hay, and certain veggies. The pellets that are purchased for bunny, should be nothing but plain and fresh, containing decent fiber content such as 15% and a protein content of anywhere between 15-19%. You’re little friend will have no problem turning his or her head away from stale food. Do you blame ‘em? Pertaining to rabbits, hay isn’t only for horses; in fact, it should be the prominent food for them to munch on. And last, but certainly not least, the veggies. Vegetables should be part of bunny’s diet consistently such as: basil, bok choy, broccoli leaves, carrot tops (‘cause ya didn’t see that one coming), celery cilantro, clovers, collard greens, dandelion leaves, dill, kale, romaine and/or dark lettuce, mint, mustard greens, parsley, and water crest. Of course let’s not forget about the occasional treats, as everybody is entitled.  In this case, such fruit as strawberries raspberries, bananas, pineapples, and apples can be given sparingly.

Rabbits are also prone to weight issues .To check if bunny is obese, PetMD says to place your hands on his ribs. If you can’t feel them under the layer of skin, chances are, he’s probably obese. Before rabbit obesity occurs,  there are some simple preventative measures one can take.

Deluxe rabbit cage (Photo: petco.com)

Deluxe rabbit cage (Photo: petco.com)

The size of the cage you purchase should be sufficient enough  for your rabbit to have plenty of space. It should  be at least two feet wide, two feet deep and four feet in depth. I didn’t name my former rabbit, Hopper’s without  reason-they have strong legs. Try to avoid a completely wired cage; rather aim for one with a solid bottom to protect their tiny legs. Bunnies are big time chewers and diggers, so make sure they’re supplied with chew sticks and cardboard . PetCo has a few things you can take a look at it when it comes to creative toys for rabbits, including the Super Pet Totally Chewbular Play Tubes, the Kaytee Tube O Hay Plus Carrot, and the Super Pet FerreTrail Roll-About Small Animal Ball.

A small rabbit may enjoy a ball. (Photo: Petco.com)

A small rabbit may enjoy a ball. (Photo: Petco.com)

If you have a child or several, the expectation of their relationship may be stereotypically skewed. Rabbits are similar to other animals when they’re introduced to a new environment. Whether shy or aggressive, they can be a bitter, as a form of protection. The bunny may need time to adjust and until then, it may react a  little defensively  in its own way. Without time and  patience, and until they know they’re in good hands, you’re not going to get the results desired. With that, be cautious around kids. They may want to hold bunny and play, but he may not be okay with that. He will act out if  he feels threatened. The good news?  Behaviors can be changed-if anybody understand, it should be us. A good tip from rabbitrescue.ca: for a household with kids, the bigger rabbit,  the better. That way, the larger in size the pet, the less likely he’ll be held. The majority of rabbits that are brought to the shelter were never given a chance at home because of this.

If you’re interested in giving a bunny a home, check out:.rabbitsanctuary.org  & Petfinder.com  and you’ll have a delightful new addition to the family.

 

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Posted by on Feb 18 2014. Filed under Animal Reality, News and Views. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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